Leigh Technology Academy, Dartford

SAS International supplied a number of acoustic solutions including wall panels, baffles and cross-talk attenuators to this flagship facility.

Key features

Sector

Education

Client

Kent County Council

Architect

Building Design Partnership

Main contractor

Galliford Try Plc

Sub-contractor

Dulley Ceiling & Partitioning

Completion year

2007

System type

SAS500

Area M2

783

Region

United Kingdom

Product Groups

The award-winning Leigh Technology Academy designed by Architects BDP, has won plaudits for its sustainability and passive environmental comfort. This 1,500 pupil school specialises in technology and ICT, and SAS International supplied a number of acoustic solutions including wall panels, baffles and cross-talk attenuators to this flagship facility.

James Warne, environmental engineering director at BDP said: “This is a truly interdisciplinary scheme that incorporates architectural, structural, landscape, lighting, acoustic, sustainability and environmental engineering working in unison.”

The building’s thermal mass is used extensively to eliminate the need for mechanical cooling. Bespoke cross talk attenuators were designed and installed between classrooms and corridors to allow for natural ventilation whilst minimising sound cross talk from room to room and control regenerated noise.

BDP designed the attenuators and worked with SAS International to produce the desired form to achieve acoustic comfort and meet BB93 requirements.

Acoustic ceiling mounted baffles were specified in the open areas such as classrooms, libraries, and canteen areas. They provide acoustic absorption while keeping the concrete soffit fully exposed for energy-efficient natural cooling.

Metal acoustic wall panels were mounted at high level to facilitate acoustic absorption. The wall panels were also installed as a feature in the College’s lecture theatre and the students have found their own novel use for the panels, as magnetic display boards.

At the recent Building Schools for the Future conference held earlier this year, The National Deaf Children’s Society drew attention to the statutory requirements for acoustics. According to the NDCS there is growing evidence that new schools, particularly those with open plan teaching areas, are being built with poor acoustics.

The College’s Vice Principal, Mark Poulter, commented: “The school is a tremendous environment for learning and working… it’s a very special space.” The M&E Consultant was Davis Langdon.

Systems used